Interesting things you should know about Italian coffee culture

Italian coffee culture

An American will have the habit of walking into a store, ordering a quick cup of coffee, and then carrying them on the way to work. The French and Vietnamese consider drinking coffee a pleasure to enjoy life: Sip and slow down. How about in Italy – one of the cradles of coffee in the world? Let’s find out interesting things about Italian coffee culture in the following article!

Interesting things you should know about Italian coffee culture

The variety of Italian coffee culture

The best-known Italian coffee is Espresso, which has been around since the 1930s, is made from pure Arabica coffee or blends Arabica with Robusta in a ratio of 60-40.

Italian coffee culture
The variety of Italian coffee culture

To create a cup of Espresso, the processor will roast the coffee beans and then grind them finely. Then use hot water compressed under high pressure to prepare. As a result, an espresso will have a very strong and aromatic taste. Espresso is also the foundation for many other famous Italian coffees such as Cappuccino, Macchiato or Latte.

Cappuccino is a drink that combines Espresso coffee, hot milk, and milk foam in an equal ratio. Referring to Cappuccino, surely cannot ignore the art of drawing milk foam on coffee cups, perhaps this is what makes Cappuccino famous and so loved.

Macchiato is made simpler than Cappuccino. To get Macchiato, the waiter will add a few flaps of hot milk on top of the Espresso glass.
About Latte, like Cappuccino, Latte is a blend of Espresso, hot milk, and milk foam. However, if in Cappuccino the amount of hot milk and milk foam is the same, in Latte, the amount of milk foam is only half of the amount of hot milk. This also explains why a latte looks less bouncy than a cappuccino. In addition, when ordering Latte, you will be served this coffee in a rather large glass, instead of in a thick cup-like Cappuccino.

In addition to the above coffees, you can try ordering a Mocha, Americano, or Lungo. These are also very famous Italian coffees.

Italian coffee culture
Italians often stand and drink coffee

“Bar” in Italian means coffee shop

Usually, when we think of “bars” we think of pubs, but in Italian coffee culture it is different, Italians understand “bar” as a place that serves authentic coffee – where you can order yourself cups of Latte or Cappuccino.

See more: American cuisine and popular dishes in America

Italians often stand and drink coffee

Step into an Italian cafe, unless you’re too tired and need to rest your feet. Otherwise, stand at the bar and enjoy your coffee like the locals. Not only will this help you integrate and familiarize yourself with Italian coffee culture, but it will also save you half of what you pay compared to sitting in a chair and waiting for the waiter.

Italian coffee culture
Italians often stand and drink coffee

Pay before you order coffee

It’s not mandatory everywhere, but as a rule of courtesy, it’s better to go to the checkout, say what you’re going to order, and pay first. Then, keep the bill, bring it to the bar and give it to the waiter. They will bring you the exact cup of coffee you ask for.

Don’t order Cappuccino afternoon

Do so if you want to fit in with the Italian coffee culture. Because if you order a cup of Cappuccino after lunch at a local bar, people will look at you with very strange eyes.

Italian coffee culture
Don’t order Cappuccino afternoon

Regarding the origin of the habit, some people explain that Cappuccino causes digestive disorders in the afternoon, there are also opinions that because the foam and cream in Cappuccino are already considered a substitute for a meal. So if you want to drink Cappuccino, it will be better if you have them in the morning.

Conclude:

Above are interesting things you should know about Italian coffee culture. If you have the opportunity to visit this beautiful country, don’t forget to experience the typical cups of coffee here in the bars!

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